Thursday, June 22, 2017

'Defenceless' pensioner, 65, 'was battered and stabbed to death with a hammer and a Poundland craft knife by his 38-year-old bride's lover

  • Lover of alleged killer married pensioner shortly after split from her ex-husband
  • Court hears accused impersonated alleged victim to set up life insurance policy
  • He then murdered him with a hammer and a craft knife at rented flat, jury told
  • Both the alleged killer and his lover deny murder in an ongoing trial  
Muhammed Arif is accused of getting his lover to marry a pensioner with learning difficulties, who he then murdered for money
Muhammed Arif is accused of getting his lover to marry a pensioner with learning difficulties, who he then murdered for money
A pensioner was battered to death by his young bride's lover in a plot to cash in on his £250,000 life insurance, a court has heard.
Father-of-two Mohammed Yousaf, 65, was found dead at a rented house in Accrington, Lancashire after he was hit over the head with a hammer as he slept, a jury was told.
Two months before his brutal murder, his alleged killer Muhammed Arif had pretended to be Mr Yousaf to set up a life insurance policy in a nearby Barclays bank, Preston Crown Court heard.
The jury heard Mr Yousaf's wife of just five months, 38-year-old Rukhsana Bibi, had been having a long-running affair with married Arif before the killing.
Mr Yousaf had learning difficulties, was illiterate and could not read or write in English, prosecutors said.
He was found dead in September last year. Tests showed his skull had been 'shattered' and he had knife wounds to his neck thought to have been inflicted with a Poundland craft knife.
The victim's undated will named Bibi as beneficiary and Arif, 45, as a legal guardian. But documents found with the will were believed to have forged signatures on them.
Detectives who searched Bibi's home in Todmorden, West Yorkshire found what they believed were practice signatures in Mr Yousaf's name on a piece of paper, Preston Crown Court heard.
Mohammed Yousaf, a 65-year-old who had learning difficulties, was found dead at a rented flat in Accrington, Lancashire in September last year
He was found dead at a rented flat in Accrington, Lancashire in September last year
Mohammed Yousaf, a 65-year-old who had learning difficulties, was found dead at a rented flat in Accrington, Lancashire in September last year
'This was we say a planned killing in order to make monetary gain,' said Gordon Cole QC prosecuting. 'Muhammed Arif has in effect inveigled his way into Mohammed Yousaf's domestic and financial arrangements through his girlfriend Rukhsana Bibi.
'Throughout the relevant time we say Arif was having a sexual affair with Bibi.' 
Mr Yousaf married Bibi under Islamic law in April 2016 - just two days after her divorce from first husband Abdul Hafeez with whom she had two children and who was Arif's brother.
But ten days before the wedding Mr Yousaf had 'gifted' his £45,000 home in Accrington to Mr Hafeez during a meeting at a solicitor's office.

Arif himself attended the meeting and claimed the transfer was a 'gift' to assist Hafeez in 'applying for a visa for his wife.'

In that same month, an application was made for a £500,000 life insurance policy in Yousaf's name. The sum was reduced at the request of insurers Avia to £244,411, the court heard.

Arif is said to have impersonated Mr Yousaf to set up the life insurance policy
Arif is said to have impersonated Mr Yousaf to set up the life insurance policy

The court heard Arif himself purported to be Yousaf and attended a branch of Barclays to commence the policy.

Mr Cole said: 'Mohammed Yousaf had been receiving support from a social worker, and there had been concerns he may been have had learning difficulties.

'Mr Yousaf himself had reported to his social worker that it was Arif who had proposed the marriage between him and Bibi.

He added: 'Arif and Bibi were to benefit financially from the death of Mohammed Yousaf. There is evidence of Arif and Bibi having lived together before she married Hafeez - a relationship that had gone on for quite some time.

'Notwithstanding the fact that he had arranged the subsequent marriage, the prosecution say that the affair, that relationship continued after Bibi's marriage to Yousaf.'

Police at the murder scene in Accrington after Mr Yousaf's battered body was found
Police at the murder scene in Accrington after Mr Yousaf's battered body was found

Arif picked up Mr Yousaf from an airport and took him to an empty property and killed him, it was alleged.

The victim's body was found by the landlord of the property when he round to collect the rent.

The court heard Bibi was in Ireland at the time visiting a brother of Arif.

Arif's home in Accrington was also searched and there police found Mr Yousaf's will, which named Bibi as a beneficiary and Arif as the guardian of £25,000 cash. Traces of the victim's blood were also found in Arif's VW Passat.

Arif and Bibi both deny murder. Arif's wife Amna Asif, 48, denies perverting the course of justice by providing her husband with a false alibi at the time he is alleged to have committed the murder. 

The trial continues.

GP is arrested on suspicion of GBH after three-month-old boy was 'circumcised without his mother's consent'

  • Dr Balvinder Mehat was arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm
  • He is said to have performed circumcision on a three-month-old baby
  • The baby was visiting its paternal grandparents and the mother is believed to have been unaware that the operation was taking place 
  • 'Landmark case' could be first time non-therapeutic circumcision treated as GBH
Dr Balvinder Mehat (pictured) has been held by police after a three-month-old was operated on
Dr Balvinder Mehat (pictured) has been held by police after a three-month-old was operated on
A family GP has been arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm with intent after a baby boy was circumcised without his mother's consent. 
Dr Balvinder Mehat has been held by police investigating the procedure after a three-month-old was operated on during a visit to his paternal grandparents, who are Muslim. 
The boy's parents are separated, with Dr Mehat alleged to have carried out the circumcision for religious reasons before the infant was returned to his mother later the same day.
The mother complained to the police about the clinician, who works at the Bakersfield Medical Centre in Nottingham, claiming her son was in obvious distress when he was handed back to her. 
Campaigners say it is believed to be the first time a police force has treated 'non-therapeutic' circumcision as GBH.
The 26-year-old mother says the child, now aged four, has suffered repeated physical problems, including inflammation and water infections, in the years since the operation as a direct result.
The circumcision took place in July 2013. The mother, who lives in Nottingham, originally called social services, then contacted police on in November 2014.
There was an investigation, but Notts Police initially decided it wasn't a criminal matter, and the case was referred to the General Medical Council.

However, the force reopened the inquiry after the mother got assistance from the anti-circumcision group Men Do Complain, and leading human rights lawyer Saimo Chahal QC, who wrote to senior officers.

Dr Mehat was arrested on Wednesday, along with a 44-year-old man and woman, 47, believed to be the child's paternal grandparents, who were held on suspicion of conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm. 

All three have been released pending further investigation.

Bakersfield Medical Centre in Nottingham, where the GP who was arrested for GBH works. The baby was circumcised without his mother's knowledge
Bakersfield Medical Centre in Nottingham, where the GP who was arrested for GBH works. The baby was circumcised without his mother's knowledge

Richard Duncker, of Men Do Complain, said: 'It (the arrests) is good news because it gets the issue of child genital surgery for non-therapeutic reasons into the public debate.

'It is important we take the protection of children seriously. This is one of society's blind spots when it comes to children.'

Tim Alford, also of the group, who has been in regular contact with the mother, added: 'She feels vindicated. It has been a long struggle to get this recognised.

'She has witnessed the suffering of this little boy. He has had numerous infections, both on the wound and in the urinary tract. It's not fair. He is only four, and all he has known is grief.

'I have been campaigning for some time, and this is the first time I have seen the police refer to non-therapeutic circumcision as GBH. It is quite a landmark.

'Saimo Chahal decided the police had misapplied the law and threatened them with a judicial review unless they reopened the investigation.

'The boy's parents were in a very short relationship, but she thought it was the right thing for him to know that side of his family.'

In its statement, Notts Police said: Officers investigating the circumstances surrounding a circumcision conducted on a child in July 2013 have arrested three people.

'A 61-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm with intent.

'A 44-year-old man and a 47-year-old woman were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm.

'They have all been released pending further investigation.
'Our enquiries are ongoing.' 

Armed police to guard Stonehenge solstice celebration

“Armed police to guard Stonehenge solstice celebration,” BBC, June 20, 2017:
Armed police will be on patrol at Stonehenge as thousands of people gather to celebrate the summer solstice.
Extra security measures have been put in place following the recent terrorist attacks in London and Manchester.
Wiltshire Police said the move was to “reassure the public that we are doing everything we can to keep them safe”.
The Pagan Federation said it “sadly accepted” the need for such security measures.
About 12,000 people attended the Neolithic site last year to mark the summer solstice, which takes place tomorrow.
Visitors will only be allowed to bring small bags with them and are urged to only bring essential items….

Terrorists could face tougher prison sentences as part of new crackdown in the Queen's Speech

  • A new extremism crackdown was included in the Queen's Speech today 
  • It will include a review of prison sentences for terrorism-related offences 
  • A Commission for Countering Extremism comes after a wave of terror attacks 
  • May vowed 'enough is enough' and 'things need to change' after London Bridge 
Building on Theresa May's vow to overhaul anti-terror laws in the wake of the London Bridge attack, today's Government programme announces a new Commission for Countering Extremism.
No 10 today said the review would consider all aspect of counter terrorism policy, including the controversial Prevent programme. 
The Prime Minister has warned Britain has been too tolerant of intolerance and promised things would change as the nation undergoes a wave of attacks. 
Armed officers patrolled outside Parliament today (pictured) ahead of a Queen's Speech that included new counter terrorism plans 
Armed officers patrolled outside Parliament today (pictured) ahead of a Queen's Speech that included new counter terrorism plans 
In the speech, the Queen said: 'In the light of the terrorist attacks in Manchester and London, my Government's counter terrorism strategy will be reviewed to ensure the police and security services have all the powers they need, and that the length of custodial sentences for terrorism-related offences are sufficient to keep the population safe.' 

In the wake of attacks at Westminster, Manchester and London Bridge, Mrs May warned of an 'unprecedented' threat from terrorism.  

She said 'enough is enough' and laid out a four point plan for how she would tackle problem. 

She announced a review of counter-terrorism strategy to make sure police and security services have 'all the powers they need to protect our country'.

The new Commission for Countering Extremism will be given the task of supporting the Government in 'stamping out extremist ideology in all its forms'.

It will review counter-terrorism powers, prison sentences for convicted terrorists and work with internet firms to halt the spread of extremist material.

Official figures show sentences handed to those convicted of terror-related charges have been increasing.

In the year to the end of March, the most common term was between four and 10 years, accounting for 41 per cent of the cases.

This denoted a shift compared to the previous two years, when the most frequent sentence length was between one and four years.

The counter-terror review is included among the 'non-legislative' measures outlined in the Queen's Speech - but the Government insisted it 'will not hesitate' to introduce new legislation if necessary.

Officials will also look at what further steps need to be taken to halt the spread of extremist material and 'poisonous' propaganda online.

In her speech in the aftermath of London Bridge, Mrs May said: 'In light of what we are learning about the changing threat, we need to review Britain's counter-terrorism strategy to make sure the police and security services have all the powers they need.

'And if we need to increase the length of custodial sentences for terrorist-related offences - even apparently less serious offences - that is what we will do.

'Since the emergence of the threat from Islamist-inspired terrorism, our country has made significant progress in disrupting plots and protecting the public.

'But it is time to say `Enough is enough'.

'Everybody needs to go about their lives as they normally would. Our society should continue to function in accordance with our values.

'But when it comes to taking on extremism and terrorism, things need to change.'  


Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Police Taser a muslim man outside Regents Park Mosque after he 'tries to attack worshippers' with a shoe horn

  • Witnesses to the incident at Regents Park Mosque feared a fresh terror attack
  • Man in his thirties, was 'shouting abuse and threats' while 'waving' a weapon
  • Some claimed he had a knife or a baseball bat - it emerged it was a shoe horn
  • Police arrived at 1.20am and he was Tasered on the pavement outside mosque
  • Met Commissioner has put more officers on mosques after Finsbury Park attack 
Police Tasered a man waving a shoe horn outside a London mosque today amid heightened tensions after the Finsbury Park terror attack.
The suspect, believed to be in his thirties, was 'shouting abuse and threats' while 'waving' a weapon at Regents Park Mosque in central London during late night Ramadan prayers.
Footage from 1.20am today shows the suspect lying face down with officers pointing Tasers at him. 
He was then shot with 50,000 volts as officers pushed worshippers back before putting him in the back of a van and speeding him away.
The incident sparked fears the Muslim community was under attack again, with some believing he had a knife or a baseball bat. 
But it emerged he was brandishing a shoe horn taken from inside the mosque and Scotland Yard say the incident is not believed to be terror related. 
He was arrested on suspicion of affray and taken into custody at a central London police station.

Officers say they are not treating it as a terror related incident.

Assistant Secretary General of the Muslim Council of Britain, Miqdaad Versi‏, tweeted this morning: 'Apparently perpetrator may be a Muslim revert with a history mental illness, having an episode #RegentsPark'. 

The attacker who was Tasered outside Regents Park Mosque was a worshipper there, a family friend claims.

Rodiya Riyadh said the man suffers from mental health problems and had 'an episode' as he went to pray.
She said: 'He is actually a Muslim with mental health issues. If anything he's more of a threat to himself, he came to the mosque with friends for prayers and then had an episode.

'I know everyone is on edge but this guy honestly has a long history with mental health issues.' 

After the incident was over he added: 'Everyone is fine this time the security team done an exceptional job and credit to the police came within a minute'.

Maria Idrissi‏ tweeted footage of the arrest and said: 'Regents park mosque now I just don't understand this world'.

She added: 'He went into Regent's Park mosque during taraweeh [Ramadan prayers] and tried to attack a man but luckily stopped by police and detained outside'.

Police have increased patrols close to mosques and arrived quickly at the scene this morning.

A Met Police spokesman said: 'The item being waved was found to be a shoe horn taken from the mosque.

'The incident is not being treated as terrorism-related at this time. Officers are keeping an open mind regarding any motivation for the incident.' There were no reports of anyone injured, he added.

Commissioner Cressida Dick has authorised for an additional 1,867 officers - a total of 6,400 - across the capital to be equipped with tasers following the increase in violent crime.

Commissioner Dick said: 'Keeping the public safe from harm is at the heart of our job.

'With this uplift, my officers will be better equipped to protect the public and themselves.

'We know that the mere presence of a taser is often enough to defuse a dangerous situation and often get a suspect to drop their weapon if they're armed.

'Taser reduces the need for physical contact and also the risk of unintended or unnecessary injuries to all parties.

'With the roll-out of body worn camera to every uniformed officer, the public can also rest assured that the use of taser is correctly recorded and monitored and that the use of it is subject to comprehensive scrutiny.' 





BRUM JIHADI BARRED Brit stripped of his UK citizenship after fleeing to Syria to join jihadi-linked group

A BRIT who fled to Syria to join an Islamist-linked group is set to have his UK citizenship STRIPPED from him.
Akif Razaq, who is British-Pakistani, was barred just two days after the Manchester terror attack.
Akif Razaq, who is British-Pakistani, was barred just two days after the Manchester terror attack
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Akif Razaq, who is British-Pakistani, was barred just two days after the Manchester terror attack
Razaq, right, has now been barred from entering the UK, it is reported
FACEBOOK
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Razaq, right, has now been barred from entering the UK, it is reported
The 30-year-old from Birmingham works for media organisation On The Ground News in Syria.
It is thought to be closely-aligned with al-Qaeda, according to The Times.
An official document, seen by The Times, concluded Razaq is “aligned with an al-Qaeda-aligned group”.
It added that if he returned he would “present a risk to the national security of the United Kingdom”.
Razaq, who is the first Brit to be deprived of their citizenship in two years, denied any involvement in jihadi activity.
He told the paper: “I was shocked, surprised and intrigued.
“I’ve never seen myself as a threat to my home country and it surprised me that others would see me so.
“I would have thought that a solid case was required to deprive me of citizenship.”
He added that he plans to appeal against the decision, issued on May 24.
There is no evidence that Razaq has been involved in fighting in the Middle East.
Brit authorities fear hundreds of Brit jihadis who have travelled to warzones in Iraq, Syria and Libya could try to return and carry out attacks.
Manchester bomber Salman Abedi had recently returned from Libya where ISIS has established a North African base.

Write a letter to terrorists! Children told to ‘respect’ killers in new teaching aid

A NEW teaching aid that recommends schoolchildren as young as seven “write a letter to a terrorist” to help understand their motives has been condemned as “dangerous and misguided”.

Schoolchild
GETTY STOCK IMAGE
New teaching aid that recommends schoolchildren as young as seven 'write a letter to a terrorist'
The book, Talking About Terrorism, published weeks before the , describes the indiscriminate mass murder of innocent members of the public as a “type of war”.
It tells primary age children that terrorists kill people because they believe they are being treated “unfairly and not shown respect”.
It gives examples of “” whose ideas then turn out to be right: “The Suffragettes used violence and were called terrorists...” it stated.

BRILLIANT
The book, Talking About Terrorism, was published weeks before the Manchester Arena atrocity
his a crackpot idea based on the misguided notion that primary school children must engage with, and show 'respect' for, religious fanatics who are seeking to kill them
Chris McGovern - Campaign for Real Education chairman
“Today many people think of them as brave women and admire their struggle for the right to vote.”
In an activity recommended for pupils aged seven to 11, teachers are urged to “invite children to write a letter to a terrorist. If they could ask a terrorist six questions, what would they be?”
The book, published by Brilliant Publications and containing a foreword by Peter Wanless, the chief executive of the NSPCC, has been slammed by critics who say it is potentially dangerous.
Chris McGovern, chairman of the Campaign for Real Education, said the letter task would confuse and potentially upset pupils.
He said: “This a crackpot idea based on the misguided notion that primary school children must engage with, and show “respect” for, religious fanatics who are seeking to kill them.
“It is part of the “British Values” agenda that is being forced on schools by Ofsted and the educational establishment. 
“The primary school classroom is not the place to humanise terrorism by ‘pretend dialogue’.”
In trying to help children “understand” terrorists’ motives, the book invites sympathy for the killers, critics claim. 
And by invoking the Suffragettes and Nelson Mandela, it leads children to question whether terrorism might be justifiable, they say.
McGovern said that while the book did condemn terrorism, it strayed in to dangerous territory in its attempt to help children understand the issues.
He added: “It provides plenty of ‘explanation’ for excusing it. It strongly urges teachers to ensure young children, ‘Show respect for people who are different to ourselves’.  
“This admirable rallying cry can result in a call to respect the point of view of terrorists, too.”
But Alison Jamieson, one of the co-authors of the book, defended the publication and said children’s letters were not to a specific terrorist and were not intended to be sent.  
She said: “I disagree that understanding terrorism is a short step away from sympathy and I challenge Mr McGovern to show any example of our book showing sympathy for terrorism.
“Especially when dealing with ideological indoctrination, it is difficult to see how terrorism can ever be defeated unless one understands the grievances that drive it and where anger and hatred come from.  
“Military force, even where it is possible, is never enough.”  
She went on to say that to dismiss terrorist motivations as “not worthy of attention” will not make them go away.
“We state quite clearly in the section on Al Qaeda and Islamic State that these sections are not necessarily subjects for discussion in the classroom,” the author added. 
“As we clearly state in the Teacher’s Tip we are providing this information primarily for teachers. There is no suggestion that they should relate all of this to pupils.”
A NSPCC spokesman said: “Terrorism is a difficult issue for children to understand, but we know from calls to our Childline service that terror attacks can often make children feel anxious, worried and upset, so it is important that they are able to talk openly about it and understand why terrorism should not be tolerated.”

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Finsbury Mosque Terror: What They're NOT Telling You






I thought the acceptable, non-racist response to terror attacks was to just pretend they're not happening & carry on as normal? #FinsburyPark

Image result for manchester bombing ariana grande


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